Pro golfer Jarrod Lyle dead of cancer at age 36

Australian professional golfer Jarrod Lyle has died after a long battle with cancer, his wife announced Wednesday. He was 36.

"It breaks my heart to tell everyone that Jarrod is no longer with us," Briony Lyle, said in a statement. "He passed away peacefully at 8.20 p.m. last night having spent his final week among his family and close friends."

Last week, Lyle and his family announced that he had decided to end his treatment foracute myeloid leukemia and would undergo palliative care at his home.

Briony Lyle said her husband had asked her to pass on a "simple message: ‘Thanks for your support, it meant the world. My time was short, but if I’ve helped people think and act on behalf of those families who suffer through cancer, hopefully it wasn’t wasted.’"

JARROD LYLE ENDS CANCER TREATMENT, FOCUSES ON PALLIATIVE CARE

Lyle, a two-time winner on the Nationwide Tour (now the Web.com Tour), was first diagnosed withacute myeloid leukemia at the age of 17 and suffered recurrences in 2012 and 2017. He underwent a bone marrow transplant in December of last year.

He returned to competitive golf in 2013 after apparently having beaten cancer for a second time. He made an emotional comeback at the 2013 Australian Masters in Melbourne before using a medical exemption to play on the U.S. PGA Tour in 2015. He played four seasons on the U.S. tour, where he earned $1.875 million in 121 tournaments.

News of Lyle’s death prompted an outpouring from his fellow pros on social media.

"Such a sad day, we will all miss you so much Jarrod," tweeted 2013 U.S. Open champion Justin Rose. "Thinking of his family at this time."

"Our thoughts and prayers go out to the Lyle family," wrote Masters champion Patrick Reed. "You were and always will be a fighter and will be missed by so many people."

Lyle is survived by Briony and daughters Lusi, 6, and Jemma, 2.

"Lusi, Jemma and I are filled with grief and now must confront our lives without the greatest husband and father we could ever have wished for," Briony Lyle said.

"At the same time, we have been blessed and overwhelmed with the messages and actions of support from around the world and feel comforted that Jarrod was able to happily impact so many people throughout his life. Our humble thanks to you all."

The family said a private family service would be held in the coming days with a public memorial service in Torquay, near Melbourne in Victoria state, at a later date.

At Bellerive County Club outside of St. Louis, Bryson DeChambeau announced Tuesday that he would donate his $25,000 prize in the PGA Championship Long Drive competition to the Lyle family.

"I just thought it would be the right thing to give [the money] to Lusi and Jemma," DeChambeau said. "They deserve that and they need that more than anything right now."

Mosquito bite sends North Carolina boy, 6, to ICU

A North Carolina mother is warning others about a little-known mosquito-borne virus that almost killed her young son.

LoriAnne Surrett of Asheville, North Carolina, said her 6-year-old son Noah and his brothers were at their grandparents’ house when he complained of a headache, FOX Carolina reported. Noah was given some pain medication and he appeared better until Surrett received a phone call from her in-laws that the boy was not quite right. The grandparents called 911 and Surrett rushed to the house to see her son.

The mother wrote in an Aug. 8 Facebook post that her son was limp and had blue lips. Officials said the boy suffered a seizure. Noah underwent blood tests, a CT scan, a chest X-ray and a spinal tap, which revealed that he was suffering from La Crosse encephalitis.

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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said the rare virus “is transmitted to humans by the bite of an infected mosquito.”

“Many people infected with LACV (La Crosse encephalitis) have no apparent symptoms. Among people who become ill, initial symptoms include fever, headache, nausea, vomiting, and tiredness. Some of those who become ill develop severe neuroinvasive disease (disease that affects the nervous system). Severe LACV disease often involves encephalitis (an inflammation of the brain) and can include seizures, coma, and paralysis,” the CDC said.

Noah Surrett

Noah Surrett was taken to the ICU after he became ill following a mosquito bite.(LoriAnne Surrett )

The mother said her son was treated at the ICU at Mission Hospital in Asheville, where he was responsive just a few times a day.

"Noah is a spunky little dude that sickness never brings him down," Surrett wrote in a Facebook post. "So this is breaking all of our hearts."

ZIKA, WEST NILE VIRUS REPORTED IN ALABAMA, HEALTH DEPARTMENT WARNS

Surrett said her son started responding to her on Thursday, and was opening his eyes. She warned others to wear bug spray to avoid the virus.

"I don’t want to see another baby go through this," she said. "Use bug spray on your kids, check for bites. It’s not 100 percent preventable obviously, but do what you can to try."

Noah Surrett

Noah Surrett’s mother said her son has been responsive since being rushed to the hospital.(LoriAnne Surrett )

The North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services said people can avoid contracting the virus by wearing long sleeves, bug spray and spend less time outside when mosquitoes are active.

Woman with ‘bloated’ stomach discovers she had 14 pounds of ovarian tumors

One “bloated” 26-year-old woman recently learned that her pregnant-looking belly was in fact caused by 14 pounds of stage 3 cancerous tumors in her ovaries.

The New Zealander has since had surgery to remove the growths and a full hysterectomy, and is now undergoing chemotherapy.

Sarah Nicholson toldChronicle Live that she began having abdominal pain, fatigue, loss of appetite and a change in toilet habits last year, and she suspected she was suffering from irritable bowel syndrome.

“I had symptoms which could have been of things less serious, like irritable bowel syndrome,” the Cochrane Park, Newcastle resident said. “But I had a round bloated stomach, which looked as if I was pregnant, and I knew it was just not right.”

VIRGINIA WOMAN DONATES KIDNEY TO STRANGER: ‘GOD CALLED ME TO DO THIS’

A doctor’s scan soon revealed that Nicholson in fact had two tumors in one ovary, one weighing 10-pounds and the other 4-pounds. Worse, the malignant growths were stage 3 cancer.

“Part of me crumbled inside. The other part was kind of relieved that I had a diagnosis,” Nicholson recalled of her diagnosis. “They said I was at stage 3— that’s one stage away from being terminal. This was really serious and I knew it was going to affect my future.”

Nicholson underwent surgery to remove the tumors and also made the decision to have a full hysterectomy.

“For me it was a no-brainer and I decided to have it. I did not want the risk,” she said of her choice. “It was a difficult decision to make and it was upsetting because it would mean I would never have children of my own.

“But it was to give me a better chance of life. It was the right thing for me to do,” she added.

CONTAMINATED FOOD SERVED AFTER FUNERAL CEREMONY KILLS AT LEAST 9 MOURNERS

Known as the “silent killer”, the symptoms of ovarian cancer are often believed to be less severe medical issues. Ovarian cancer is the tenth most common cancer and the fifth-leading cause of cancer death in the U.S., according to theCenters for Disease Control and Prevention.

The Chronicle reports that though roughly eight in every 10 cases of the disease are diagnosed in women over the age of 50, ovarian cancer also affects hundreds of younger women each year, prompting Nicholson to advocate for awareness.

“[Ovarian cancer] clearly can happen to younger people which is why I feel so strongly about getting the message out to younger women,” she told the outlet.

“I would ask people to listen to your body. You know your body best and if you think something is not right, get it checked out.”

Back in May, an anonymous Connecticut woman made headlines for having a 132-pound ovarian tumor removed from her abdomen.

Washington man donates kidney to wife of nearly 30 years: ‘We’re a team’

A Seattle, Wash., man recently donated one of his kidneys to his wife of nearly 30 years.

“We’re a team,” Steve Kennedy told Q13 News of his decision.

Last month, Steve donated his kidney to his wife, Lesley, who has long suffered from polycystic kidney disease, a condition that “causes numerous cysts to grow in the kidneys,” according to the National Kidney Foundation. The cysts, which are filled with fluid, can damage kidneys if they grow too large.

In Lesley’s case, the condition worsened to the point where she was put on dialysis. Her physicians informed her that she would need a transplant in order to survive.

VIRGINIA WOMAN DONATES KIDNEY TO STRANGER: ‘GOD CALLED ME TO DO THIS’

Needless to say, the couple, who enjoy traveling and will celebrate their 30th anniversary in October, was worried.

"It’s not easy asking someone for a kidney," Lesley told the news station. "It’s not something you just walk up to anybody on the street and say hey, would you be willing to give me a kidney?"

Not long after, Lesley’s colleague and sister each offered to donate a kidney to her. But neither was a match.

It was then that Steve decided he would like to donate a kidney to Lesley, undergoing tests to determine if he were a match. He was.

On July 19, Steve posted on Facebook that the surgery, which took place at Virginia Mason Hospital in Seattle, was successful.

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“My donated kidney appears to be doing pretty well in its new home inside Lesley. But it may be a bumpy ride for a while. Thanks to everyone for their incredible love and support,” he wrote.

"It’s probably the best thing I’ve ever done in my life, " Steve added to Q13 News, which reported that the couple is now back home and recovering.

“Also consider organ donation,” Steve wrote. “It is truly an amazing gift to be able to donate. Especially to your spouse.”

Wisconsin woman’s death linked to bacteria from dog saliva, doctors believe

A Wisconsin woman’s death has been linked to dog saliva that caused a rare infection that spread to the rest of her body.

In June, Sharon Larson, 58, was rushed to the hospital days after her new puppy nipped her hand, causing a small cut.

Within two days of arriving at the Wheaton Franciscan hospital in Franklin, Larson died of an infection that doctors believe was transferred from the dog’s mouth.

“I was told she could get struck by lightning four times and live, win the lottery twice,” said Sharon’s husband Dan Larson to Fox 4. “That’s how rare this is supposed to be."

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The doctors tried general antibiotics, but according to her husband the medication “didn’t do anything.”

“I feel like I got robbed. Lost my right arm. My best friend,” Dan Larson said to FOX4.

Larson’s daughter, Stacy Larson-Hruzek, added on Facebook that she "loved [her] mother with all of [her] heart," and urged anyone bit by a dog to follow the CDC’s guidelines and contact them immediately.

Doctors told the grieving widower that his wife tested positive for capnocytophaga, a bacteria found in most cats and dogs that, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, “rarely” spreads to humans and cause illness — but when it does it can be deadly.

However, the rare infection has popped up twice in the state this summer.

Greg Manteufel from Wisconsin contracted a dangerous blood infection after he was licked by a dog, possibly his own. What he originally thought was the flu, turned out to be a serious bacterial infection that forced his doctors to amputate his legs.

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Nearly 45 miles away in West Bend, Greg Manteufel had to have all four limbs amputatedafter he contracted the bacteria from a dog lick.

Doctors suggest that people with weakened immune systems are at the greatest risk for contracting capnocytophaga, but Manteufel’s case, who had a history of good health, is prompting questions into how the infectious disease takes hold.

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Larson’s son, Steven, now wants answers about the potentially fatal illness, which typically begins with flu-like symptoms.

“I had no knowledge,” he said. “What do you want people to know? To always be more cautious. People think nothing of getting a simple dog bite. But even something so simple… can go wrong,” he said to FOX4.

Teen baseball star paralyzed in diving accident

A Kansas teen gearing up for his senior year of high school suffered a life-changing injury in a tragic diving accident last week that rocked his baseball teammates and their community.

Nolan Sprague, who according to his coach excelled on the mound and was headed for college ball, was paralyzed in the accident and may never walk again, Fox4KC.com reported.

“It’s always shocking when it’s somebody that you’re close to,” Jeff Strickland, Mill Valley High baseball coach, told the news outlet. “You hear about things like that happening, but when it happens to somebody that you’re close to, I guess that’s the shocking part of it.”

WISCONSIN’S WOMAN DEATH LINKED TO BACTERIA FROM DOG SALIVA

Sprague, whose family owns a baseball academy down the road from the high school, was injured at a neighborhood pool on Thursday and underwent surgery at Overland Park Regional Medical Center on Friday morning. Strickland said baseball is a “big, big part” of Sprague’s family life, and that he’s helped coach him since he was 7.

Some of Sprague’s teammates were on-hand for the 17-year-old’s 4:30 a.m. procedure on Friday.

“For some of these kids, it’s the first truly traumatic thing that’s happened in their lives,” Strickland told Fox4KC. “So you want to help them deal with things, and if you preach in a program that you’re there for your buddies and your family, then you need to be there.”

Fundraisers and a GoFundMe page have brought in more than $101,000 to help cover medical expenses.

Face transplant gives woman ‘second chance’ 3 years after suicide attempt

A 21-year-old survivor of a suicide attempt became the youngest person in the United States to undergo a face transplant after three years of reconstructive procedures and more than 15 hours on the operating table.

Katie Stubblefield, who is featured in National Geographic’s "The Story of a Face" cover story in the September issue, had dubbed her pre-transplant, reconstructed face “Shrek,” and is still recovering from the May procedure.

National geographic

Stubblefield is featured in National Geographic’s September cover article, “The Story of a Face.” (National Geographic)

Stubblefield, who went through a hard breakup and a series of medical issues over a short period of time, shot herself in the face with her brother’s hunting rifle during a 2014 visit to his Tennessee home. The brother, Robert, told National Geographic that he found the then-18-year-old covered in blood and her face “gone.”

According to the report, the bullet tore through her forehead, nose, sinuses, jaw bones and badly damaged her eyes. Surgeons responsible for saving her life in Memphis attempted to cover her facial wound using a tissue graft from her abdomen, but failed, and she arrived at the Cleveland Clinic with “her brain basically exposed.”

WARNING: GRAPHIC PHOTO AHEAD

Mandatory usage requirements:  DIGITAL USE- Please note: You may use a total of FOUR (4) images max for your online feature.Mandatory Usage Requirements:1.Include mandatory photo credit with each photo (see caption/credit info in attached doc)2.Provide a prominent link to natgeo.com/face near the top of your piece, ahead of the photos3.Include Mention that "The Story of a Face" is the cover story of National Geographic's September issue4.Feature the September cover of National Geographic mag somewhere in the post (credit: National Geographic) unless using only one image***Branding may not be removed from the photos. Photos cannot be edited or cropped.BROADCAST USE- Please note: No limit to the number of photos available to use during your segment. Mandatory Usage Requirements:1.Include mandatory photo credit with each individual photo shown on screen (see caption/credit info in attached doc)2.Verbal mention that "The Story of a Face" is the cover story of National Geographic's September issue 3.Show the September cover of National Geographic mag at some point during the segment***Branding may not be removed from the photos. Photos cannot be edited or cropped. PRINT USE- Please note: You may use a total of ONE (1) image max for your print feature. Mandatory Usage Requirements:1.Include mandatory photo credit with each photo (see caption/credit info in attached doc)2.Include mention that "The Story of a Face" is the cover story of National Geographic's September issue3.Feature the September cover of National Geographic somewhere in the post (credit: National Geographic), unless using only one image***Photos cannot be edited or cropped.Please note: If you'd like to include mention of the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline in your feature or segment, we encourage you to include the number, 1-800-273-8255, for readers and viewers to call to reach a trained counselor, or incorporate the following into your

A surgical resident carefully cradles Katie’s head to keep it still as she’s situated in the intensive care unit after the 31-hour procedure concluded. To protect her eyes, her eyelids were sutured shut.(Lynn Johnson/National Geographic)

Dr. Brian Gatsman, a head, neck, skin and high-risk soft-tissue cancer specialist, oversaw Stubblefield’s care at the clinic, and said the bullet also caused a traumatic brain injury and severely impacted her hormones and sodium levels, as well as frontal lobe function.

His team of 15 specialists helped create a nasal passage for Stubblefield, as well as patch her face and form jawbones using her fibula and titanium. They moved her eyes closer together with a distraction device that had to be tightened daily. Part of her thigh and Achilles tendon helped cover the wounds, but Stubblefield had grown accustomed to going out in public with a surgical mask or covered with scarves.

According to the report, Stubblefield was placed on a transplant list and waited for over a year for a donor match. During that time, two potential donors didn’t work out. Her eventual donor, 31-year-old Adrea Schneider, has helped at least seven people through organ donation.

Mandatory usage requirements:  DIGITAL USE- Please note: You may use a total of FOUR (4) images max for your online feature.Mandatory Usage Requirements:1.Include mandatory photo credit with each photo (see caption/credit info in attached doc)2.Provide a prominent link to natgeo.com/face near the top of your piece, ahead of the photos3.Include Mention that "The Story of a Face" is the cover story of National Geographic's September issue4.Feature the September cover of National Geographic mag somewhere in the post (credit: National Geographic) unless using only one image***Branding may not be removed from the photos. Photos cannot be edited or cropped.BROADCAST USE- Please note: No limit to the number of photos available to use during your segment. Mandatory Usage Requirements:1.Include mandatory photo credit with each individual photo shown on screen (see caption/credit info in attached doc)2.Verbal mention that "The Story of a Face" is the cover story of National Geographic's September issue 3.Show the September cover of National Geographic mag at some point during the segment***Branding may not be removed from the photos. Photos cannot be edited or cropped. PRINT USE- Please note: You may use a total of ONE (1) image max for your print feature. Mandatory Usage Requirements:1.Include mandatory photo credit with each photo (see caption/credit info in attached doc)2.Include mention that "The Story of a Face" is the cover story of National Geographic's September issue3.Feature the September cover of National Geographic somewhere in the post (credit: National Geographic), unless using only one image***Photos cannot be edited or cropped.Please note: If you'd like to include mention of the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline in your feature or segment, we encourage you to include the number, 1-800-273-8255, for readers and viewers to call to reach a trained counselor, or incorporate the following into your

Adrea Schneider, pictured in 2017, became Stubblefield’s face donor after she died of an overdose. Her organs also helped save at least seven others. (Courtesy of the Bennington Family)

Scheider’s grandmother, Sandra Bennington, who gave consent for the donation, met Stubblefield in person recently, and said she recognized her granddaughter in small features on Stubblefield.

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Stubblefield’s surgery marks the 40thface transplant conducted in the world, and the third to occur at Cleveland Clinic.

The procedure is considered experimental and is largely funded by the Department of Defense through the Armed Forces Institute of Regenerative Medicine, National Geographic reported.

Stubblefield faces several more procedures and will remain on anti-rejection medications for the remainder of her life.

She said she hopes to heal to the point where her young nephew isn’t afraid to look at her.

“I want to go out and be a face in the crowd that no one looks at,” she reportedly told her mother, Alesia.

“We all like her nose; her lips are pretty,” Gatsman told National Geographic. “There are things we know are going to get better when we fix them, like the jaw reduction. But some things we can only do so much to improve upon. Her injury may have been the worst injury of any face transplant injury ever. We can’t necessarily make all of her muscles move again. Her tongue is not working well because she lost a lot of tongue muscle and nerves.”

Georgia teacher donates kidney to 12-year-old student

A sixth-grader in Georgia isgoing to get an “unbelievable” gift from his technology teacher Tuesday: a kidney.

William Wilkinson, a teacher at Grace Christian Academy in Powder Springs, is serving as a living donor to his student, Kaden Koebcke,Fox 5 reported Monday.

The 12-year-old’s first kidney transplant — performed when he was five years old with his father donating — didn’t work out.

“It came back so badly that they had to remove it within five days of them putting it in, so that— that definitely didn’t go as planned,” Koebcke, who was diagnosed with a kidney disease at the age of two, told the news station.

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Koebcke’s family sought help through a Facebook page calledKaden’s Kidney Search.

"With his particular situation, he can’t receive a kidney from a deceased donor, so he is in need of a living kidney donor," the page explains.

Koebcke’s mother, Cami, will never forget the day Wilkinson visited their home to reveal he had found a perfect match.

“He says, Well, do you guys really wanna know? And we said, Yeah, we wanna know, we wanna thank him,’” she told the station.

“And you know, He’s like, ‘Well, it’s me.’ And I mean it just — I mean … it was unbelievable,” Cami recalled.

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For Koebcke, life without dialysis would be something to look forward to.

“I’ve had to be on dialysis for about 10 years now, and it’d really be awesome to live a normal life and not have to live life hooked up to a machine,”he told the station.

Wilkinson appeared to have a successful surgery on Tuesday,according toKaden’s Kidney Search.

“Will’s surgery is done and he did well with vital signs stable throughout! The kidney is already over to the other hospital and they are in the process of getting the kidney into [Koebcke].Continue the prayers!!!” theKoebcke family wrote on Facebook.

Boy in wheelchair pulls himself to feet for national anthem at Tennessee fair

A 10-year-old boy who often uses a wheelchair and requires braces on his legs managed to stand for the national anthem at a Tennessee fair on Sunday night.

Avery Price has hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) syndrome, a condition similar to cerebral palsy, which makes it difficult for him to use his legs, Fox 17 reports. Despite the disability, however, Avery said he wanted to show his patriotism at the Putnam County Fair in Cookeville.

“I usually sit and put my hand on my heart, but last night I decided to stand … because I like to stand for my country,” Avery told Fox 17.

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Both of Avery’s parents have said they were “very proud” of their son.

“That makes me feel really good, especially [considering] the stuff he’s been through, and the fact that he still wanted to do that, that’s amazing to me," said Avery’s dad Stephen Price, who helped steady his son during the anthem. "He’s a very, very patriotic kid … He’s always been that way."

And not only did Avery’s patriotic moment touch the hearts of his parents, but it also echoed across the Internet after Leah Norris, a woman sitting nearby, shared footage of the touching scene to Facebook.

“A very proud young man. Just goes to show you even a disability can’t hold you back in the things you believe in,” wrote one commenter.

"Thank you for sharing this very moving video. A lot of very rich professional athletes can learn something from this young man,” added another.

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Jenny Leigh, the country artist who performed the national anthem at the fair, called Avery “awesome.”

“It’s awesome, it’s a great display of patriotism,” said Leigh. “And in my opinion, it’s a great example of love, not only from him and his dad, but the community as well.”

Fox 17 also confirmed that Avery had only recently started attempting to walk after a surgery at a Nashville medical center.

Virginia girl’s love of dolls helps save baby when aunt unexpectedly gives birth in bathroom

A 10-year-old Virginia girl’s fondness for dolls helped save her newborn cousin after her aunt unexpectedly gave birth in a bathroom on Monday.

Chloe Carrion was in a Fairfax County home with her expectant 21-year-old aunt, who has not yet been identified, when the aunt complained she didn’t feel well.

The pregnant woman went into the bathroom with stomach pains only to realize she was actually in labor, WJLA News reported.

“She screamed my name and she says, ‘I had a baby.’ And I said, ‘No you didn’t,’ and she said, ‘Yes I did,’" Chloe told the news station, which reported the 21-year-old had been hiding the pregnancy from her family.

GEORGIA WOMAN GIVES BIRTH IN CHICK-FIL-A PARKING LOT: ‘IT WAS INTENSE’

When Chloe ran to the bathroom, she couldn’t believe what she saw: her aunt had given birth on the toilet. The woman handed Chloe her newborn son before falling and passing out.

At that time, Chloe called her mother, April West, for help. West, who was in disbelief, saw the child for herself when Chloe used FaceTime to prove the child existed.

“She turned the phone around because we were on FaceTime, and on the camera I saw this little face,” West recalled to WJLA News.

While waiting for emergency medical officials to arrive, Chloe decided to put to use the same skills she’s learned from taking care of her baby dolls. Much of what she’s learned has been from watching videos on YouTube.

"The videos helped me with swaddling and cleaning him up from everything," Chloe explained.

Chloe, with help from 911 dispatchers, then used a pair of household scissors to cut the baby’s umbilical cord.

"Chloe was just standing at the front door with the baby swaddled, and she was rocking him back and forth," said West, who arrived shortly before emergency officials.

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The baby, who’s been named Isaac, and his mother were taken to a local hospital. Both are doing well.

"I’m very proud of her. She was so brave,” West added. “Even as an adult, I don’t think I could have done what she did.”